18006
Charles Henry Theodore Costantini (1803 – 1860)
Portrait of Mary Tame, 1854
Watercolour on paper
20.3 x 15 cm (sight)
Signed & dated lower right

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13011, 13012 & 13013
Jemima Frances Irvine  (1822 – 1918)
(Purple and Yellow Pansies) 1866, (Tulips & Bluebells) & (Orchids)
Watercolour on paper
Various sizes

Jemima Frances Irvine nee Burn (1822 – 1918) emigrated from Scotland to Tasmania with her father, playwright David Burn (c. 1799 – 1875) at the age of four. They lived initially with her grandmother at the Hamilton property Ellangowan, later moving to Rotherwood, Ouse. In 1843 she married Charles James Irvine who was appointed senior assistant superintendent at the Port Arthur penal colony. Despite the notoriety of the settlement, Irvine regarded her time spent there with fondness; ‘In those days there was a charming society at Port Arthur… all [of the officials, their clerks and their families] were intelligent, musical and altogether delightful people… We were very happy and so were many of the prisoners’.1 Irvine later moved to Ingleside, Evandale, where she became known as an avid collector, artist and conchologist. She remained at Evandale until her death in 1918.

1. Kerr, J (1992), Dictionary of Australian Artists: Painters, Sketchers, Photographers and Engravers to 1870, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, pp. 391 – 392

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08086
John Gould (1804 – 1881)
“Ornithorhynchus anatinus” (Platypus)
Hand coloured lithograph
34 x 50.5 cm (sight)

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17108
John Gould (1804 – 18841)
‘Aquilla Morphnoides’ (Little Eagle)
Hand coloured lithograph
51.5 x 34 cm

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17061
Haughton Forrest (1826 – 1925)
(Tasman’s Discovery Ships; the Heemskirk & the Zeehan)
Oil on canvas
51.5 x 80 cm
Signed lower left

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As the 19th century came to a close, Hobart society took on a renewed interest in the early European history of the Tasmanian colony. This interest saw the eminent painter Haughton Forrest’s first forays into historical painting. After exhibiting at the ‘Old Hobart’ exhibition of 1896 with paintings depicting Old Government House, Hobart and Sarah Island, Macquarie Harbour, Forrest turned his hand to the earliest chapter of the island’s European history; the sighting of the west coast of Tasmania by the Dutch explorer Abel Janzoon Tasman (1603 – 1659) in 1642.1

1. Brown, G D (1982), Haughton Forrest 1826 – 1925, Malakoff Fine Art Press, Melbourne

Haughton Forrest (1826 – 1925)

16121
Haughton Forrest (1826 – 1925)
(The Old Mill at New Town Creek)
Oil on board
31 x 47 cm
Signed lower left: ‘H Forrest’

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By the end of the 19th century, the mills and farmhouses of the New Town area were a favourite subject among local and visiting artists. Built in the early days of the colony, many of these buildings exhibited a rustic charm which no doubt appealed to the English sensibilities of the colonists.

The mill depicted in this work by Forrest was, during Forrest’s time, known simply as ‘The Old Mill’, however is believed to be the building used by the short-lived Constantia Distillery, which opened in 1824, advertising ‘a good, wholesome and pure spirit’ in The Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemen’s Land Advertiser that year.1 In January 1825, Governor Sir Thomas Brisbane raised the excise on locally produced spirits and the distillery subsequently closed.

The building was then used to house orphans prior to the completion of the orphanage at St. John’s New Town, while the proprietor, William de Gillern (1787 – 1857) relocated, eventually to Longford, where he acted as a justice of the peace before returning to Hobart in 1857.

1. Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemen’s Land Advertiser (24 September 1824, Hobart), p. 2

William Buelow Gould (1803 – 1853)

17043
William Buelow Gould (1803 – 1853)
“Still Life, Fruit and Flowers”
Oil on canvas
61cm x 71cm (sight)
Signed & dated lower left

Provenance:
The Ted Gregg Collection, Sydney
Private Collection, Victoria

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